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Earthship Lands in Colorado

earthship

Stuart Simmons lives just outside of Durango, Colorado in his Earthship.  The Earthship is a house made up of recycled materials.  The main building component of the Earthship is used tires.  The tires are filled with earth and stacked like bricks to make the http://thegracedarlinghotel.com.au/levitra-online-50mg building’s primary walls or structural walls.  The internal walls are made up of aluminum cans that are held together with concrete and covered in adobe plaster. 

The Earthship is heated by passive solar heat via a large Greenhouse attached to the building.  Photovoltaic panels provide electricity, which powers Mr. Simmons’ home office and super efficient Sun Frost refrigerator.  Their cooking is done on a wood-burning stove. 

If you want to learn more about Earthships there are many great resources at earthship.org. 

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Cans of concrete?, Low-rated comment [Show]
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librarians and earthships
written by John, October 26, 2006
(In response to express viagra delivery the commenter: Am I crazy or are trees more of a renewable resource than, say, coal-generated electricity? Modern wood stoves are so super-efficient, and so awesome, that they're great for people who live on some land and won't burn more than they can grow.)

Also, there is a librarian who blogged about my book once (she hated it, as I recall) who is generic sample viagra building one of these earth ships. They're pretty awesome, I think, if usually very very small.
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Toxic tires.
written by rob, October 26, 2006
While using waste products is laudable, I thought that tires gave off hazardous chemicals as they broke down, wouldn't this permeate the living areas?

On a brighter note, the land is very cheap in Durango $62,000 for 55 acres, I think I'm emigrating.
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Re: librarians and earthships
written by GTW, October 28, 2006
Why are we talking about coal when every other post on this blog is about solar electricity? And by gas I meant compost gas.
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Details
written by Celia, November 10, 2006
Where's the greenhouse? How big is it? Is it bigger than a single wide? Can it stand up to hurricanes and tornadoes?
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the offgassing non-issue. Tires are haza
written by earthship biotecture, April 15, 2007
There is an extensive study by the University of Wisconsin-Madison that was presented to us by the state of viagra on sale New Mexico. The cover page of which is here. It can be obtained through the University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, Wisconsin, 53706. It would probably cost something to get it. In addition to this study, we have 30 years of experience living with the tire buildings. It has been our experience that this type of first-hand knowledge is http://www.tedxamsterdamed.nl/2013/no-prescription often more valuable than any study at any price. Tires are Hazardous is piles, not Earthships.

read the report here:
http://www.earthship.net/modul...cle&sid=21
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...
written by Matt Lew, September 02, 2008
the use of wood burning stoves, recycled materials, etc. are dependant on the cheap levitra canada number of people using them. take WVO biodiesel fuels for example. it is a fuel source anyone with a brain can make resulting in free (or atleast cheap) fuel for those using it, but if we all did, there would not be enough fry oil out there to supply the demand, and resteraunts would be selling it at $4 a gallon or whatever the going rate of dinofuels where that day. one of the kids who works for me owns a dodge charger... that engine could run on http://meivending.com/online-pharmacies pure alchihol with a li'l work as many moonshiners could tell you, but if we ran our engines on pure cornjuice, there is not enough farmable land in america to supply the gas demand much less food needs for the US. Wood burning stoves are banned in some areas for the amount of click now buy prescription cialis without polutants produced, the smog levels in some areas where wood is a common heat source are on par with LA at it's worst.(though in my opinion the wood does not smell as bad) yet bio fuels including wood put back nothing they did not take out of the air. still in the 1900s areas where being deforested faster than they could be replanted due to buy viagra free shipping wood burning. it is renewable only so long as the demand does not outstrip the levitra online sale supply. for that matter what is oil? my highschool science class told me oil and www.diabetes.org.br coal where the decomposed remains of plant and animal matter that died millions of years ago. if this is true, then it is a renewable resource as well, but one in which the renewal rate is not going to catch up with the demand for another million years or so. by then I hope we have advanced beyond such needs.

now moving on to the tires. I have read that the average earthship takes about 2000 tires (IIRC) I think I average 2 tires per year personal consumption... my farther on the other hand when he was working as a regional computer tech was putting on a ton of miles each week, and was replacing all four a couple times per year, so lets be generous and say he was using 12 tires per year? someone wanna do the math real fast and tell me how many years of that it would take to build a retirement home out of those tires for he and my mother? I count 167 years at that rate. so obviously demand again can outstrip supply. but the reason to use them instead of taking them to the recycleing center is viagra online doctor simply a recycle center is suposed to return our materials to tramadol no prescroption useful service, and this style of construction clearly does just that, so why use all concrete when you can recycle your materials and get the added bennifit to the world around you?

It is not for everyone, but it is still a great idea.
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...
written by Matt Lew, September 02, 2008
Oh and a reply specificly for rob... Actualy it is quite the buy viagra china oppisite effect. I used to live next to a former army amunition plant. Needless to say the ground there is quite contaminated with a number of unpleasant things. Some time after the plant was closed down it was decided that it was a burdon on the economy to have so much unusable land, so they decided it was a good place to sell off and use as an industrial plant among other used. When they began researching the possible solutions to can you buy ultram in canada the contamination problem, someone presented a possible sollution in tires. It seems that shreading the tires and where can i purchase cialis introducing the rubber into the ground allows the buy levitra over night shipping carbon that the tire manufacturers use to make them black (which protects them from UV damage among other things) to serve it's purpose as natural binding agent to toxins. the carbon from the tires is actualy reported to be able to help remove the contaminants fom the soil. Though I moved before being able to find out any of viagra by mail the follow up results, a chemist friend of mine tells me the theory is sound.
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resources
written by j. miles, December 23, 2008
where do you get all of the tires at , and how many do you need . I have read thet you need any where from 1600 to 5000. Also do earthships work in wet enviroments ? thank you.
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Earth berm
written by Brendan, March 18, 2009
I see you are using berms on generic levitra in canada 3 sides of your home. Could you please let me know how thick the concrete walls must be to support the earth (especially when wet)? Also, I live in Houston, Texas where it is hot and humid all day and night in the summer. From what I understand about thermal mass, it just gives an average temperature to your home. That obviously won't be good for me (105 degree day and 85 degree night will be 95 degrees in the house), but I'm not sure if this was just referring to www.hasselaar.nl above ground concrete houses. I also read that soil temperature 6 feet underground stays at a constant 58 degrees. I'm not which is correct in this case. Could you please enlighten me to your experience dealing with your home? Basically, is it always colder down there and you use passive solar from your windows to heat it, or is it always an average temperature between the viagra next day delivery low price high and low of the day.
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...
written by Will, April 20, 2009
You guys are all retards... You should probably think / read on sustainable development before you write a bunch of crap that doesn't make any sense... Including this question: Why couldn't he just make the walls out of pure concrete or concrete bricks and take the cans to a recycler? Wow...
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a few questions
written by doxy, July 29, 2009
First, if you build an earth ship using clay plaster on the inside and just burying the outter side does this work better with the off gassing problem?
I have read a few discussions and cialis cheapest online prices people keep arguing that the tires with contaminate the soil, but do they think that it wont if its in a pile in a different state? Isn't all the plastic and rubber, etc. , going to break down at some point, and isn't it better to put it back in the earth where it came from? I know it was never meant to have such high concentrated spaces of these chemicals but its gotta start decomposing some time, right?
Seccond, I am looking into moving to northern MO and was wondering if there is a "better" building type for that area? I assume that there might be more off gassing in NM because of viagra mexico the heat but would they have the same problem in a cooler climate?
Thank you!!!!
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...
written by robert h., November 17, 2012
hey, just finished the earthship academy, have been building and living in earthships. the concept needs to link for you rx online cialis be updated on Ecogeek because there is a lot of misunderstanding by the public, as evidenced by many of the comments.

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