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GM's Deal with Mascoma and buy cialis online no prescription What it Means

Less than a year ago, GM announced that it was investing in Coskata, a startup with a unique process for turning waste materials into fuel. Now they've announced that they've invested, and taken equity, in Mascoma, another cellulosic ethanol producer. Coskata can turn things like corn husks and mulch and even old tires into ethanol. Mascoma's process is a bit more limited, but also turns non-food plants into ethanol. GM loves ethanol because, if it can be produced cheaply, locally, and sustainably, then cars might continue their supreme reign for another fifty years.

GM has already invested a lot of money in creating biofuel vehicles, and they plan to have most of their new vehicles be E-85 capable by 2012. Of course, having E-85 capable vehicles is useless without ethanol. So GM, it seems, is giving a little shove to the genuine viagra in australia industry. And they're also planning on making some money off of it.

Coskata's process is somewhat unique among ethanol makers. Instead of using microbes and enzymes to digest the cellulose, Coskata uses a self-sustaining plasma reaction to gassify the stuff into CO and hydrogen gas before feeding it into a bioreactor. This eliminates the need for specialty microbes that are able to where buy viagra digest tough plant fiber. It also allows Coskata to use a wider range of feedstocks, including lignin (what trees are made of) and even plastics.

Mascoma uses a more traditional approach. They physically chop the plant material down, and then their specially selected microbes are able to eat it and convert it into sugar (first) and then ethanol. Mascoma's process, however, requires the addition of viagra online pharmacy external enzymes, which are very expensive. But it doesn't require the input of as much energy as Coskata's process.

In short, both Coskata and Mascoma are leaders in cellulosic ethanol production, but they use very different techniques. At this early stage in the discount viagra cialis levitra online development of these fuels, GM is wise to be attempting to spur development of more than one cellulosic ethanol production method. And while both techniques are going to be producing ethanol for sale in the U.S. soon, there's no way to tell which is we like it buy levitra where going to be cheapest or most disruptive.

GM, with its deep pockets, can afford to invest in these companies. First, because there is a lot of money to viagra us canada be made in cellulosic ethanol. But, second, because without cellulosic ethanol, it might not matter what GM does with any of its money. Without the cheap, sustainable fuel that these companies hope to promote, the system that GM thrives on, and GM itself, might not exist at all.

Read the GM Mascoma Press Release here (PDF). And check out Mascoma's description of their technology at their website.

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Comments (9)Add Comment
0
so much for EVs
written by james, May 03, 2008
I finally got around to watching "Who Killed the Electric Car", and am skeptical all over again about the so-call GM commitment to the Volt. Now I see where they want to put their money. They want to keep burning stuff in ICE cars. That GM came out with a very popular electric car already with the battery technology of 10 years ago, and yet still claim the batteries are not up to par, makes their protests seem like another delay tactic a la just a few years ago.
Excuses, delays, bait and switch!
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cnn front page article 4:40 EST 5/3
written by jules, May 03, 2008
According to only for you order cheapest viagra online one GM engineer, Gas is here to stay...

http://money.cnn.com/2008/04/29/autos/gas_engine_improvements/index.htm?postversion=2008050216

thoughts Hank?
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written by Green Builder, May 03, 2008
Based on the www.hitlabnz.org various comments and the best choice buy viagra in canada no prescription actions they have taken over the years it doesn't seem GM is vary genuine in their efforts to end combustion engine dependency. If they had their way we would all drive 13mpg SUVs.
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written by Josh, May 03, 2008
I saw "Who Killed the Electric Car?" ad I think it's incredibly biased. There are some who might have really wanted one, but most people still want a much longer range. With how few hybrids GM ad Ford have actually made, I'm betting they cost a bit more than they let on. I bet the EV1 was the same. I really think, from the film, GM just didn't want people to hate/sue them because they didn't have the range they were so used to.

GM is in business to sell cars. They want you to buy cars and if they can make money selling them running on E85 or hybrid or electric they will. They just want to make sure that you won't go somewhere else if you're upset about such a low range. GM wants to make money, they really don't care how. As our demand for "greener" transportation grows, they have more "green" options.

Our economy is based on us mass producing and consuming. We can either find a way to do it that is more friendly to generic cheap viagra the Earth or watch our economy fall apart.
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CNN Article
written by Hank, May 03, 2008
@Jules, thanks for pointing me in the direction of that article...cool stuff. First, I think that ICEs are going to be around for a long time. GM isn't planning any pure EVs at all...and only startups are working on buy cialis in england pure EVs that will be highway capable.

That being said, ICEs can burn ethanol almost as well as they can burn gasoline...so this article isn't really saying gasoline is here to stay, it's saying that burning liquid fuels is here to stay. The headline is viagra online 50mg misleading. Cellulosic ethanol fits right into GM's hope that ICEs will last another 20 or 30 years.

That being said, GM has spent huge amounts (billions) of money on fuel cells and battery technology...and that's more than a PR effort. So while it's true that ICE is going to be around for a long time...that doesnt mean it's going to be the only option. But GM is counting on biofuels to keep ICEs alive in the face of thegracedarlinghotel.com.au rising demand for, and diminishing supply of oil. Electrification will take more time than biofuels...I have no doubt of that...but it's good to see GM (and Ford, Chrystler, Honda, Toyota and others) all working on near, medium and long term solutions...becuase they recognize that it will be necessary for their survival.

They would love to keep selling the free samples cialis same technology at inflated prices...of course...but I think they've figured out that they can't do that and survive.
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...
written by Bob Wallace, May 04, 2008
GM doesn't make batteries. They buy batteries from other companies and viagrabest viagra so far no one has delivered a battery pack that will meet the needs/desires of American drivers.

GM has used 'real world' driving data and found that *at this point in time* what will work for American drivers is a plug in hybrid. Most people will find the Volt's 40 mile range with an overnight charging good enough for their everyday driving. But not enough for the weekend trip, etc. They will need some sort of ICE to provide the extra range that is sometimes needed.

If biofuels can be produced for less money than imported petroleum then growing fuel makes sense.

Home grown biofuels also hold the promise of less CO2 released into the atmosphere, more in-country jobs, and fewer dollars shipped to foreign sellers.



0
...
written by Bob Wallace, May 04, 2008
GM doesn't make batteries. They buy batteries from other companies and so far no one has delivered a battery pack that will meet the needs/desires of American drivers.

GM has used 'real world' driving data and found that *at this point in time* what will work for American drivers is a plug in hybrid. Most people will find the Volt's 40 mile range with an overnight charging good enough for their everyday driving. But not enough for the weekend trip, etc. They will need some sort of ICE to provide the extra range that is sometimes needed.

If biofuels can be produced for less money than imported petroleum then growing fuel makes sense.

Home grown biofuels also hold the promise of less CO2 released into the atmosphere, more in-country jobs, and fewer dollars shipped to foreign sellers.



0
step in the right direction
written by Eric, May 07, 2008
I think GM’s investment in biofuel technologies is a step in the right direction. It is debatable whether E85 in its current production could ever be economically or ecologically viable. If biofuels can work, GM has the http://www.wowgraphicdesigns.com/how-much-is-levitra resources for the necessary research and development.
0
With GM's record. . .
written by Sally G, September 26, 2008
I wonder if this is another attempt to sabotage an alternative technology. Anyway, cellulosic ethanol is definitely an improvement over corn-based ethanol.
I recently saw Who Killed the Electric Car?, and although it had a definite viewpoint, the number and variety of sources interviewed lent it credibility. And one point made in the director's statement on the Web site is provocative: where were the mainstream media when this was occuring? If he hadn't gotten the helicopter footage of http://www.asian-americans.com/brand-viagra-for-sale the destruction of the EV1s before fully funding the film, the opportunity would have been lost. And GM bought the 80% of Stanford Ovshinsky's battery company in Michigan—and prohibited them from press releases to national media announcing technical advances. Is that a sound policy? And from what the movie said, when GM sold its interest in that company, it was sold to Chevron (who, one only hopes, is interested in expanding its range of energy offerings). After all, GE is investing in wind turbines. It's certainly interesting to very good site buy viagra australia watch, and with luck and activism, may be positive.

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