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ESolar Opens America's First Solar Power Tower


Just a few hours ago, ESolar switched on America's first utility-scale solar power tower. This new power plant has two towers and cialis soft tabs 10 mg 24,000 mirrors and produces around 5 megawatts of power, enough to power about 4000 homes in areas near the Lancaster California power plant. ESolar has strong funding from the likes of Google and other large clean-tech focused venture capital firms.

ESolar's new power plant is small scale, but an excellent demonstration of their technology. The goal of viagra online india the project (one might say this is the http://cngnewengland.com/free-viagra-sample goal of all solar power projects actually) is to online order levitra produce electricity cheaper than coal. But ESolar seems to have a technology that is impressing people in the know. Already they have contracts to build 465 more megawatts of these solar power towers at three sites in California and New Mexico.
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written by Oakleigh Solargroupies, August 06, 2009
When you compare the building a nuclear plant over 10 years, billions of dollars and no radioactive waste storage for the next 500,000 years, this seems like an infinitely brighter idea.
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written by Roger Brown, August 06, 2009
As I have written before, CSP in the desert needs air cooling if it is going to scale up to produce a large fraction of our electricity. Air cooling will lower efficiency and raise up front capital cost.

The "cheaper than coal" goal is cialis doses important for people who cannot stand to get out of bed in the morning unless they believe that stock market growth will continue for the rest of their lives. For people with a little more ecological sophistication, an energy source that is sufficiently expensive to order viagra now bring to an end our adolescent dreams of infinitely expanding wealth and power, but cheap enough to provide a decent standard of living with wise management is something to be hoped for.
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written by Bob Wallace, August 06, 2009
Roger, doesn't one need to cool the steam only enough to for the water to return to liquid form?

If so, the goal would seem to be minimal cooling. If water goes back into the tower just under 100C it would take less energy to www.omroepgroesbeek.nl cause a state change back to steam.

Summer desert days may run in the neighborhood of generic cheap viagra licensed pharmacies 110F/43C. That's a lot of "cool" compared with 100F. It would seem that all one would need to do buy cialis in beijing is to pump the water through a large enough heat exchanger.

Keep the cialis online switzerland resistance in the heat exchanger low, size the pipes large enough, and not much additional energy would be needed added to the pumping that is already on http://robert-alonso-photos.com/cialis-discount going.



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written by mayan calender?, August 06, 2009
October 5th? Dontcha mean August 5th?
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written by Roger Brown, August 06, 2009
Bob,

Here is part of the abstract from an NETL paper "Department of Energy/National Energy Technology Laboratory’s Power Plant-Water R&D Program":

"The United States Geological Survey (USGS) estimates that thermoelectric generation accounts for approximately 136,000 million gallons per day (MGD) of freshwater withdrawals, ranking only slightly behind agricultural irrigation as the largest source of freshwater withdrawals in the United States. As U.S. population and look there online levitra prescription associated economic development continues to expand, the demand for electricity will increase. The Energy Information Administration’s (EIA) latest forecast estimates U.S. coal-fired generating capacity will grow from approximately 305 GW in 2004 to 453 GW in 2030. As such, coal-fired power plants may increasingly compete for freshwater with other sectors such as domestic, commercial, agricultural, industrial, and in-stream use – particularly in regions of the country with limited freshwater supplies."

There is no reason to believe that CSP will have lower water requirements than coal plants. A steam turbine is a steam turbine.

Air cooling works, by the way. Check out spxcooling.com. However, certain kinds of CSP, such as Ausra's linear fresnel design which has relatively low operating temperature, may not be good candidates for air cooling.
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written by Bob Wallace, August 06, 2009
Roger, you're referencing a water cooled turbine.

These are closed loop/air cooled systems. They do not "use water" in the sense that a fresh water cooled coal plant does.

Your C&P does not relate to my question.
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written by Roger Brown, August 06, 2009
"These are closed loop/air cooled systems. They do not "use water" in the sense that a fresh water cooled coal plant does. "

You do not know what you are talking about. The internal turbine water in CSP plants, coal plants and nuclear plants is part of a closed loop, but external cooling is cialis no prescription done with water because it is more efficient and has lower capital costs than air cooling. The required heat exchangers for air cooling are quite large and they are not as efficient as water cooled systems. There is no reason why a CSP turbine should have different cooling requirements than any other steam turbine.
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written by Bob Wallace, August 06, 2009
Well, I stand corrected...

Esolar will use recycled water for cooling the towers. He said he believes it to be among the earliest plans to wow it's great viagra without prescription online use "purple pipe" water - recycled water - for uses beyond irrigation and watering.

The most notable element, he said, is that recycled water treated to a high degree of get viagra perscription online cleansing called tertiary treatment will then be used to recharge the recommended site beta blockers and viagra aquifer beneath the Antelope Valley.



http://www.avhidesert.com/forum/index.php

Interesting. Esolar has managed to avoid Roger's concern that their coolers would compete for freshwater with other sectors such as domestic, commercial, agricultural, industrial, and in-stream use – particularly in regions of the country with limited freshwater supplies.

Estore has apparently found a valuable byproduct of their technology in that it "scrubs" municipal waste water making it much more acceptable to return to the aquifer.
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Hey Hank
written by Tom, August 07, 2009
Just a note to ya, I like the way you edit your videos like the YouTube celebrities. I subscribed to you now, you're good and I look forward to cialis costs more videos. :-)
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Cooling Towers
written by russ, August 08, 2009
The established and factual water consumption number for a CSP with cooling towers is 2.5 to 3.0 liters per kW.

The losses are to evaporation! That is not recoverable! There is a whole lot of BS being spread here!

They could use air cooling with a minimal loss of efficiency or a Heller cooling tower - but that is additional capital cost and cheap prescription viagra these companies do not care - they have the water with drawl permits in hand.

The job numbers they provide are silly for a lousy 5 mW - unless you plan to employee useless family members!

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written by Roger Brown, August 08, 2009
Esolar will use recycled water for cooling the towers. He said he believes it to be among the earliest plans to use "purple pipe" water - recycled water - for uses beyond irrigation and watering.

The most notable element, he said, is that recycled water treated to a high degree of cleansing called tertiary treatment will then be used to recharge the aquifer beneath the Antelope Valley.


Making more efficient use of our water supply is undoubtedly a worthwhile goal, but the above statement is largely public relations BS. If CSP grows into a major industry it will compete for the same water everyone else is competing for.
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written by Bob Wallace, August 09, 2009
Here's a pretty good explanation of Heller system cooling for thermal generation plants....


Heller systems can reduce water consumption in a CSP plant by 97% with minimal performance impact.


http://climateprogress.org/2009/04/29/csp-concentrating-solar-power-heller-water-use/

It looks like some good cost data will be available in 2010.
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written by russ, August 09, 2009
Good cost data on Heller cooling towers is available already - they are not new, only more expensive up front.

They are in use in many places around the world at this time.
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written by Bob Wallace, August 09, 2009
russ - any info about what they add per kWh to the cost of electricity?

The article I linked gives some comparison capital cost but it doesn't seem to put it in context of overall power production cost.
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Other technologies need combined wih such ventures
written by Vic, August 11, 2009
There are sterling cycle engines which use external heat to produce rotary motion. This energy can turn generators.

If there is excess heat that needs cooled away to allow recirculating, unless this heat is http://www.blickueberdenzaun.de/cialis-no-prescription-canada used it's loss detracts from the supposed efficiency of http://www.karlbarth.nl/pfizer-levitra the solar power production. This shows that such systems are only partly thought out and are not truly as efficient as they are toured to be.
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written by Roger Brown, August 11, 2009
Even the Stirling engine systems you reference are only about 30% efficient. The second law of thermdynamics rules. Stirlings get by without water cooling because they can operate at very high temperatures while the cialis dosage practical temperature limit for superheated steam is about 550C. One problem with the Stirling dish systems is that heat storage at these really these really high operating temperatures is not practical at present.
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written by Darrin, August 12, 2009
These technologies would fit in quite nicely if attached to industries with high heat requirements (waste heat used for process heating or absorption cooling). Question is, what industries would like to mexican viagra operate out of a desert and will the increased transport requirement outweigh the energy cost savings. Other options which may not be popular is planting these next to the ocean and diffuse the heat. Not saying this is a great solution but it will remove some of the water consumption problems.
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I'i nterested in Residential Solar Power
written by Richard Fletcher, August 22, 2009
I am more interested in direct solar power on my rooftop and having the SDG&E or city of San Diego provide reasonable purchasing, installation, and payback.
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Flywheel technology
written by Alessandro Machi, January 09, 2010
Why cool the water at all? Why not use all of the heat to turn a huge flywheel that then stores the energy until needed? This would cool the water by converting the levitra online cheap heat into the flywheel spinning at a faster speed.

This technology is already under construction in Illinois and elsewhere. As for evaporation. The water is not gone forever, it just goes up into the atmosphere and comes down elsewhere.
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need 5 megawatt power plant
written by s.m.zahidul islam, June 12, 2010
i am intterested to set up a 5 megawatt power plant here in my country, need your help.
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written by Cooling System, March 14, 2011
I need more info about the 5 megawatts power and viagra discount its expected price for our network of Bangladesh.
Plz mail info soon
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thomas sabo
written by thomas sabo, May 13, 2011
Great blog article about this topic, I have been lately in your blog once or twice now. I just wanted to say hi and show my thanks for the information provided.

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