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Is Tesla Headed to theglobalobservatory.org Detroit
Written by Philip Proefrock on 15/01/07   
teslamichigan
 
Michigan governor Jennifer Granholm is trying to get Tesla Motors to build its new manufacturing facility in Michigan rather than in one of the previously announced frontrunner states: Arizona, North Carolina or California.
 
Tesla is already "on the www.aumm.nl verge of establishing a new engineering center" in the Detroit area, but the governor made a strong pitch for Tesla to build it's electric roadster, as well as a planned forthcoming sedan, in Michigan. "Tesla's U.S. manufacturing plant and the Rochester Hills engineering center would be focused chiefly on generic levitra online pharmacy the company's next-generation electric vehicle, a sedan that Eberhard hopes will cost around $50,000 and sell about 10 times the volume of we recommend sales cialis the roadster."

via: Michigan Radio

 

JAN 09

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Ford Airstream: A Hydrogen Hybrid
Written by Hank Green on 09/01/07   
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Here's a bit more news from the show in Detroit. I just got up close and http://www.deboerderijhuizen.nl/generic-levitra-india personal with the first non-gasoline hybrid concept. The Ford Airstream is a van, kinda, that has some pretty unique features.

The idea is very similar to the buy generic levitra online uk Volt, making the technology seem even more inevitable. But, while the Volt is how does viagra work being designed to utilize gasoline, bio fuels, or hydrogen, the Airstream would use only hydrogen fuel cells to recharge it's onboard batteries.

The vehicle is a plugin electric, just like the Volt would be, but the car is significantly more futuristic, and also much larger, and a more limited pure-EV range than the Volt.

The Volt is superior to the Airstream in one very specific way, all of the infrastructure necessary for the Volt is currently in place. And while the Volt could work as a fuel cell vehicle in the limited areas were hydrogen infrastructure exists, the Airstream could not operate anywhere but in those places.

Also, it's quite obvious that GM is more serious about it's E-Flex system, and has developed it much more significantly, than Ford has.

 

JAN 07

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The Chevy Volt: Somewhere Between Sixty and One Million Miles per Gallon
Written by Hank Green on 07/01/07   
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Have I been hinting enough? Have I been saying that GM is going to do something that, while not healing the hurt they’ve dealt out over the last few decades, will at least get their foot in the door of the gasoline rehab clinic?

Well here it is, and it’s beautiful.

The Chevrolet Volt is a hybrid hatchback that can get anywhere from a sixty to a million miles per gallon.

OK, so you all trusted me until I said that, and now you’re checking to see if it’s April already. But I’m for real.

The Volt contains two engines, like any hybrid car, a gasoline engine and an electric engine. However, the gasoline engine never actually propels the http://www.accessibleadventuresvt.org/viagra-india car.

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All propulsion is accomplished by the electric engine which, in turn, is powered by the lithium ion batteries. The batteries are charged by plugging them into the wall. For the first forty or so miles of driving, the batteries have enough power to move the car from zero to sixty in 8 seconds and hit a top speed of 120 mph.

Then, after all that aerodynamic, electric, regenerative-brake-using driving, an ultra-efficient, small, inexpensive gasoline engine kicks on and recharges the battery. Using only power generated by the gas generator, the car gets about 60 mpg.

But if trips are less than 40 miles (which most daily commutes are) the car doesn’t use a drop of gasoline. So the majority of trips will use absolutely no gasoline at all. Technically, if you drive 40 miles a day, for 68 years, and then drove a bit more than 40 miles one day…you would get One Million Miles Per Gallon. Of course, the batteries would die long before that, and the gasoline in your tank would likely have evaporated away or, more likely, have been siphoned off by Mad Max and his post apocalyptic marauders.

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Theoretically, the 40 miles number will grow along with battery technology.  GM’s engineers have also made the innovative power train (which they’re calling the look there united healthcare viagra E-Flex System) modular. So, instead of http://www.eastgreenbushlibrary.org/cialis-online-50mg a gas generator, a diesel, ethanol, hydrogen, or hydrogen fuel cell generator could be used.

All-in-all, this is a fikkin fabulous idea that will likely be showing up in consumer vehicles of all shapes and sizes in the next five years. This will almost certainly be the first new car I will ever buy, and I will be proud to own it.

 

 

JAN 08

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The Story of the Volt
Written by Hank Green on 08/01/07   
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After having had the chance to talk with executives, engineers and designers at GM, I feel like I understand where the Volt came from, why we didn't see it sooner, and where the concept might soon be headed.

Bob Lutz pointed out that this is not really a new idea. Concept electric cars who's batteries were charged by an onboard generator existed as early as 1968. What has changed is battery technology.

In a short interview with Bob Lutz, he told me, and a group of other bloggers, that he honestly never believed battery technology would take off the way it did. He says, and I can't say whether or not he's being entirely truthful, that GM thought, after the EV1, that all-electric cars could never work. So, instead of investing heavily in battery technology, they invested in fuel cell technology.
 
More after the Jump 
 

JAN 06

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An EcoGeek in Detroit...Woah.
Written by Hank Green on 06/01/07   
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Hello All.  Aside from not being entirely certain that this trip is cngnewengland.com commensurate with my values, I am very happy to levitra online doctor be in Detroit right now, about to attend the North American International Auto Show.  
 
This very moment, I could be at the http://www.y-e-n.net/generic-pack-levitra GM style event, cavorting with the likes of Mario Lopez and other not-very-famous famous people. And while I greatly respect his work as A.C. Slater, as well as the guy who introduces the funny animal videos, I decided to stay in for the evening.
 
NAIAS promises to hold a lot of good news for green drivers and similar levitra geeks alike. In two and a half hours, EcoGeek will be releasing pictures of an innovative concept electric vehicle from General Motors that could very well change the entire automotive industry. 
 
I hope you all understand that there is only one way for me to cover these events, and that's to take GMs money. They offered me a plane ticket and hotel room for the show, and I accepted. If you would like me to, I will ask their VP of environment and energy horribly difficult questions like "What do you do viagra 100mg price when you are ashamed of your company," and then, if you really want me to, I'll bite my thumb at her, but I would feel bad about it, because she's really a very nice lady.
 
I think it's important that bloggers cover these mainstream press events, if only to bring the true ridiculousness of the entire enterprise into perspective. And it is ridiculous I mean, really, Mario Lopez?
 
But who can deny that what happens at these shows really does change the world. What happens tonight at 12:01 will help GM become a profitable company once again, and it will help our country become less dependent on fossil fuels. How could I argue with a free ticket to witness this? I hope you all understand.
 


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