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Bloomberg Plans to Turn Old NYC Landfills into Solar Power Plants


Mayor Bloomberg has outlined some new additions to his PlaNYC, which aims to cut New York City's emissions by 30 percent by 2030.  One of the major new projects will be the building of solar power plants on old landfill sites.

New York City has about 3,000 acres of shuttered landfills and look there purchasing levitra with next day delivery through this plan 250 of those will be outfitted with solar power.  Once those plants come online, they'll have a capacity of http://www.richcongress.com/viagra-philippines 50 MW, enough to canadian cialis scam power 50,000 homes.

The revised PlaNYC also includes a gradual cessation of the use of #4 and #6 heating oils.  The dirty oils produce more soot than all of the cars and trucks in the city combined.  The city will help building owners and neighborhoods transition to cleaner heating, with #6 being phased out by 2015 and #4 by 2030.

Another big goal of the plan is www.jubileecampaign.nl to create the how does viagra work New York City Energy Efficiency Corp with $37 million of federal stimulus money.  The corporation's main purpose will be provide financing to property owners for renewable energy installations and efficiency improvements.

via Crain's and Gothamist

Image via nycmayorsoffice

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0
Solar in the city
written by Sunny W. Futures, April 28, 2011
PlaNYC has some great initiatives. If those scattered landfills do not have shading issues then that solar PV is being put to good use too.

Can anyone explain how 50 MW can power 50,000 homes? Assume the 50 MW rests on single axis tracking. This may provide a very generous capacity factor of 25% for NYC. This would be 50 MW x 8760 h x .25 = 109,500 MWh per year. The EIA (http://www.eia.doe.gov/tools/f...?id=97&t=3) states the average New Yorker uses 6,972 kWh per year. So 109,500,000 / 11,040 equals 15,706 homes.

50,000 homes sounds great but how is it justified? Maybe they did not discount for capacity factor, but solar can run all the time...right? If someone argues this is peak solar, isn't peak solar the time of www.umlauf.de day when homes use the most power?
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What a waste!
written by Playaspec, May 02, 2011
I hate to say it, but solar electric doesn't make sense this far north. If Bloomberg really wanted to http://www.breinweb.nl/best-viagra-price help the environment by eliminating heating oil, he'd invest in solar for heating and hot water throughout NYC. This is the http://www.pneumapaniagua.es/levitra-no-rx best bang for the buck in solar technology, and the fastest route to weening ourselves off dirty oil.
0
EE
written by Chuck, May 05, 2011
Good way to employ the homeless in the winter sweeping off the snow which cuts output to almost zero.

Why not investigate the co-generation possibilities of the methane put out by older landfills. 3000 acres of older landfill shoulld yield several hundred thousand MW 24/7
0
progress
written by Jonathan Caren, May 08, 2011
c'mon, this is actually forward momentum. It's better than doing nothing.
0
Solar Electric makes sense in the north
written by Visual Carbon, May 09, 2011
Chuck points out that solar thermal is better payback than solar electric right now. That is true. But it doesn't follow that solar electric therefore makes no sense in northern climates.

Just look at Germany that is piling on solar electric. The Germans aren't stupid or money foolish. What they know is that solar electric is www.dukefoundation.org the future and over the lifespan of the panels will pay off handsomely.

Solar electric is doubling in deployment every two years for decades now. The price drop has been accelerating for two decades. Solar PV just got cheaper than existing electricity in Italy and is about to dependablehealthcareservices.com bust out around the http://www.peseta.org/cheap-levitra-pills globe in coming decade as cheaper than electricity prices. In other words, cheaper to install solar PV than not to...with no subsidies. The cost curve has been relentlessly down.

What a lot of areas are going to find out to their chagrin is that you can't just jump on a moving bandwagon when it is up to speed. It takes years to build a solar PV install industry and buy viagra generica all the tweaks to transmission infrastructure to support it.

Early birds will be best prepared and able to ride the wave. NYC is smart to start developing solar PV industry as fast as they can.

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