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EEStor Gets Patent on Breakthough Mystery Device

Personally, I'm very excited that lithium ion batteries are finally getting advanced enough to find homes in automobiles. But a small company called EEStor is promising "Electronic Storage Units" that will be ten times lighter, hold ten times more power, and cost half as much as lithium ion batteries.

What's more, they'll be able hold enough power to drive a car for 300 miles, charge in less than five minutes (at charging stations, not at home outlets) and will be able to charge and robert-alonso-photos.com recharge an infinite number of times.

If true, this isn't just great news for the auto industry...it's great news for consumer electronics and the power industry as well. The question is...is it true?

Well, one obstacle was overcome today, when EEStor was finally awarded a patent (PDF) on its technology. But a patent can be awarded for technology that doesn't work or isn't viable...they do it all the time. But now, at least, EEStor will be able to control the device if it turns out to be feasible.

It also opens up the window for all of us to look in on their mysterious chemistry a bit. According to cialis without prescr1ption the patent the discount viagra viagra device is a sort of capacitor that actually contains 31,353 separate capacitors in parallel. These nano-capacitors are basically a ceramic powder suspended in a plastic solution, and we're not going to pretend we understand why they can soak up so many electrons.

The patent does point out that any number of these nano-capacitors can be used in parallel, depending on the needs of the application. So, yes, if they begin manufacturing these things for cars, it won't be long before they're in your laptops and cell phones as well.

But the question of feasibility remains. They're already behind on their scheduled delivery to Zenn auto company (who currently has exclusive rights to use the storage units.) But Zenn apparently remains confident that they will have a vehicle on the roads using the technology by 2009.

I, for one, certainly hope so. But if they do, it's going to mess up a lot of other people's plans.

Via Earth2Tech and GM-Volt

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Comments (23)Add Comment
0
impossible
written by zawy, December 26, 2008
EEStor first promised production would start in 2004. This is the 3rd company Weir and Nelson have started, and it's their 3rd failure, costing investors tens of levitra discount prices millions of dollars. They lost $1 million of investor money for each of the 30 or so patents they've had approved.
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written by CL, December 26, 2008
EEStor has always had disappointing results, but then so did Edison on his first hundred or so tries of a new technology. Hopefully they are not out to simply fleece investors and are actually interested in creating a new, workable energy storage technology.
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Tentative
written by Hans, December 26, 2008
To my ears, this new type of storage sounds almost too good to be true. But by all means, let the roguelephant.com company wow us. It could be the next big thing if they make it feasible.
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Harder than it looks
written by Matt in NC, December 26, 2008
Eestor thought creating this product from observations in the lab - and ramping up to production would be strait forward. It wasn't.

But, the product they are working on is so revolutionary that skeptics won't believe it exists if it powers the car they drive to only today levitra mexico work.
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written by Phillip Ledford, December 26, 2008
I hope this is true. I think it would change the hobby of RC electric flight to do unthinkable things at this time.
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written by Clinch, December 26, 2008
From what I understand of viagra brand name this, it seems like it's just a super-capacitor, so even if can hold ten times the power (shouldn't it be energy?!?), it may have the standard capacitor problem of only being able to hold on to the charge for a limited amount of time (much shorter time than batteries, and not nearly long enough to be practical for cars).
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Capacitors.....
written by Malcolm, December 26, 2008
Oh dear, a "breakthrough mystery device". Has the www.chopperssportsgrill.com author of this ever article attended high school? There is nothing mysterious about capacitors - heck even the diagram taken from the patent clearly shows several capacitors wired in parallel.

Reading the patent application, it is apparent that the application is dodgy, since the application itself takes pains to not mention the word "capacitor".
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Where's the beef
written by Steve, December 26, 2008
I mean where's the prototype. Zenn has paid 1.3 million so far, but nothing since. I wonder why?
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awesome idea
written by Claire, December 27, 2008
Lithium ion batteries have always been my favorite, and I've always been considering their potential for improvement. I hope they'll actually be able to implement this idea in the future.
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written by hyperspaced, December 27, 2008
It's different technology than batteries. Supercapacitors are ideal for use in vehicles. They claim they used nanotechnogy in their design. So far, I have correlated NANOTECH = EXPENSIVE. I guess we only have to wait and see..
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written by EV, December 27, 2008
0.5*V^2*C=J, it supposedly holds 52.2kwh. God help anyone in the car if the ordering viagra overnight delivery capacitor breaks and medicamentosseguros.com unleashes all that energy at once. You're talking the equivalent of more than 100lb of dynamite when it is fully charged.
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@ EV
written by wheeler, December 27, 2008
Don't forget that gas holds more or less 30 kWh a gallon, that is pretty dangerous too. Besides traffic safety can be improved reducing compulsive mileage - only drive for leisure!
Have things delivered and live near your workplace.
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written by EV, December 27, 2008
Gasoline can't release all the energy at once. It would have to be thoroughly mixed with oxygen in order to do so. That doesn't happen. The closest that occurs is the gas tank becomes heated, the gasoline vaporizes and then the tank ruptures.
Besides traffic safety can be improved reducing compulsive mileage - only drive for leisure! Have things delivered and live near your workplace.

Living near my workplace and living in walking distance are two different things. Lets live in reality here, not a fantassy where everyone lives within 500 yards from everywhere they need to go.
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Power Backup
written by Nick Balandiat, December 27, 2008
The one application no one ever mentioned is backup power for ANYTHING from Computers to follow link cialis delivered overnight Home Power backup systems. Can you imagine if these things worked and you encouraged even a small percentage of homeowners to install these in their homes the grid would have a HUGE 'bank' to draw upon during peak load demands. And the homeowners wouldn't have to worry about nasty natural gas generators to keep their homes lit!
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A little explanation
written by Chris Gammell, December 27, 2008
I wrote this a few months back as the best I could understand it.I hope it helps (and explains why I don't think it'll happen).

http://chrisgammell.com/2008/1...elivering/

~Chris
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EEStor hard to believe
written by Jim, December 28, 2008
I wish I were wrong, but EEStor not having working prototype to show smells bad. I was a project engineer for a thin-fil solar company. We at least built a number of working prototypes. Our issue was taking it commercial. We lost effieciency and could not get cost in-line. If EEStor were for real, they would have a working model to showcase. It might cost $50K or more but at least the technology is proven. And to answer the question of maybe they didn't want the http://www.asian-americans.com/canadian-pharmacy-cialis-generic technology stolen while waiting for a patent... They filed in 2004 which means they probably filed a porvisional in late 2003. Once a provisional is filed, no one can take the Intellectual Property. So they should have had a working model in 2004/05 at the latest. Zenn is getting free publicity, so their small investment is really advertising. Defense contractors routinely make small "bets" on long shot technology. This hype reminds me of http://www.umlauf.de/pfizer-cialis-uk the Segway scooter that was to transform how we lived.
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...
written by EV, December 28, 2008
Can you imagine if these things worked and you encouraged even a small percentage of homeowners to install these in their homes the grid would have a HUGE 'bank' to draw upon during peak load demands.

Nope. Capacitors would store the energy as a DC source. The grid is AC. You would have to add an inverter and a lot of costly equipment for each house to be able to use these things for grid storage.
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Too many sceptics
written by Peter, December 29, 2008
Many of the sceptic comments I've read about EEStor miss one critical point. They fail to understand that when you get down to the nano scale properties of materials change and nassmc.org you get some very interesting possibilities. Just think of carbon nanotubes for example.
I don't know if EEStor can manufacture the device they describe in the patent but it is certainly plausible. There is nothing in physics which precludes an EESU from working as they suggest, its just that the issues of materials purity and manufacturing tolerences are formidable. I would be surprised if they don't have delays.
You cannot avoid the fact that Kleiner Perkins and Lockheed Martin have both signed on with EEStor. In the case of Lockheed Martin, I doubt there are many companies out there with as much experience in cutting edge technology.
The sceptic comments always seem to fall into one of four types.
1. Slandering the directors. This is an old tactic usually employed by competitiors.
2. Casting doubt based on the fact that they have not kept to some rigourous schedule. Name me a major technological breakthrough in the last 100 years that has? Radar, the jet engine, the atom bomb, the B29, the transistor; all had delays. Accountants and guys with MBA's (like the click now online ordering cialis ones that just lost billions in the markets) like deadlines and schedules, but I don't know of indian generic cialis a single inventor in history who started off as an accountant. They just don't have what it takes.
3. Doubts on the science. The science is sound. Its the fabrication that's in question. Someone made a comment earlier here that capacitors can't store energy for more than a short time. Rubbish. They can store a charge for as long as you like. He's probably thinking of AC applications for capacitors, which is completely irrelevant here, but this is typical of this kind of sceptics comment. These commentators seem to have one thing in common. Little more than a first year university understanding of physics. Some may have more advanced electrical engineering knowledge, but electrical engineers don't usually train in materials science or nanotechnology, which is what this device is really about.
4 Safety. Someone earlier compared the capacity of an EESU (52 KWh) to 100 lbs of dynamite and raises the spector of buy tramadol fedex overnight shipping an explosion. We are not talking about a chemical explosive. This is an electrical storage device. An average lightning bolt is around 500 MJ = 138 KWh. Its already been explained elsewhere that if one of these units was to discharge in one hit it would simply discharge to ground, like a small lightning strike. If you know anything about science you know that during a lightning storm your car is about the safest place you can be.
As another comparison regular gas has an energy density of about 12 KWh/Kg. The EESU has about 2.5 KWh/Kg. Gasoline is far, far more dangerous. Also, for some perspective, 52 KWh is roughly what an average residence uses in 2-3 days.

Frankly I wonder just how many of these sceptic comments are from people who have an axe to grind. People who stand to loose big time if this technology works. People the bought oil at over $100 and are still holding on to it (HA HA!), or those invested in Lithium battery technology, or those people working for companies in industries that would be adversely affected by this kind of break through. I wonder just how much of this scepticism is really astroturfing.
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written by Peter, December 29, 2008
"Nope. Capacitors would store the energy as a DC source. The grid is AC. You would have to add an inverter and a lot of costly equipment for each house to be able to use these things for grid storage."

Inverters are expensive today because the demand is so low. Economies of scale would bring the viagra cheap pills cost down. From a grid load balancing perspective, nothing would be better than tens of thousands of ultra-capacitors able to supply current on demand.
As an energy storage solution for small scale solar and wind generation they are ideal and www.americanfoods.com given what is happening with third generation solar technology I doubt that many houses would even need to be on the grid.
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Thanks Peter
written by Abram, December 29, 2008
Peter, great post concerning the EEStor skeptics. I wonder if you could join some other believers at TheEEStory.com? You have good insights and I've seen those arguments before.
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...
written by EV, December 29, 2008
4 Safety. Someone earlier compared the capacity of an EESU (52 KWh) to 100 lbs of dynamite and raises the spector of an explosion. We are not talking about a chemical explosive. This is an electrical storage device. An average lightning bolt is around 500 MJ = 138 KWh. Its already been explained elsewhere that if one of these units was to discharge in one hit it would simply discharge to ground, like a small lightning strike. If you know anything about science you know that during a lightning storm your car is about the safest place you can be.

I've seen capacitors blow before. They did not simply "discharge into the ground". The blew up. Also, the lightning is flowing around the skin or a vehicle in a lightning strike, not originating at the vehicle. I'll believe its safe when I see a demonstration of it breaking.

The EESU has about 2.5 KWh/Kg. Gasoline is far, far more dangerous. Also, for some perspective, 52 KWh is roughly what an average residence uses in 2-3 days.

These things will discharge in a fraction of order cheap viagra a second if shorted or if they break. Gasoline can't. The time scale is what matters here when compared to Gasoline.

My workplace also stands to gain significantly if these things pan out. We are a big user of Li-Ion batteries. These replacing them would aid us greatly, provided they were just as safe. The key thing, being just as safe. Li-Ion batteries are plenty dangerous as is in our line of work (aviation) due to fire hazards.
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Skeptic of EEStor
written by Jim, December 30, 2008
While I am skeptical of the science behind EEStor, I am open minded enough to know I could be wrong. Back in the day, I suspect I would have been skeptical of transmitting live images (TV) through the air and a little box in a living room showing the images. However, EEStor's lack of a prototype is a huge red flag. If they have legitimate technology, prototypes should have surfaced by 2005. GM launched Prototypes of the Volt to generate buzz while they try to figure out how to make it commercially viable. GM proved the science behind the online viagra pharmacy product. Maybe they can't produce for acceptable cost, but technology is proven. The thin-film solar company I worked for had high cost prototypes out on the market, but did not figure out commercial viability at the point I left. Again, science behind the technology proven, just not ready for prime time. I got sucked in by the Segway hype when a respected Dean Kamen had a revolutionary technology that would change the way we get around. After that fiasco, I have learned to keep my science hat on and review the data and prototypes.

Regarding the just released Lockheed-Martin project, my only comment is that it should be easier to accomplish this, and with anything military, cost is no object at least initially. L/M is not going to be out anything with EEStor if this fails to launch.
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Looking for Love in all the Wrong Places
written by Uncle B, February 03, 2009
What ever happened to cold fusion? did anyone ever try it with depleted uranium or is that a military secret? Can depleted uranium be involved in super-batteries, or is that a secret too? Just how much of modern technology in an atmosphere of http://www.diabetes.org.br/levitra-and-women rabid capitalism, is considered too secret to reveal? Why has "Area 51" gone solar, don't they have small Toshiba reactors from Japan that work like portable, fuel free generator sets? EEStor's "power bucket' must involve more than parallel capacitors, how about extremely high voltages, and circuits to induce/reduce them to usable levels, and switched, to make for greater output periods? Sounds certainly possible, and will take some very sophisticated development technology to do it, hang on critics, you ain't seen the whole picture yet, just the preview!

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