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Thomas Edison, 1931: "I'd Put My Money on Solar"



OK, I'm about to cry...

In 1931, not long before he died, the [Edison] told his friends Henry Ford and www.deboerderijhuizen.nl Harvey Firestone: “I’d put my money on the sun and solar energy. What a source of only now how to get levitra in canada power! I hope we don’t have to wait until oil and coal run out before we tackle that.”

AGGHHHHCHCC!!!

That, from the cialis made in the usa New York Times Magazine, is the conclusion of an excellent article on the Clean Green Thinking of America's most famous inventor, Thomas Edison. You can read the whole article here, but the gist is that Edison worked on levitra en gel various green initiatives, including electric cars, wind turbines, and an off-the-grid home in New Jersey that the New York Times then called "utterly and for all time independent of the nearness or farness of the big electric companies."

From this, I learn two things. First, apparently "farness" used to be a word. Second, our reliance on cheap fossil fuels has created a kind of stagnation in the energy industry that is pretty depressing. It's just as Edison feared, we've had to webstuff.nl wait until oil and coal are running out to tackle the price of viagra abundant renewable energy created by our natural environment. He wasn't an environmentalist, so don't let the New York Times fool you there, but he knew a good idea when he saw one. And now, finally, we're moving forward once again.
 

TXTing Fuels Chinese Green Revolution

One million text messages. That's how residents of China's port city of canadian cialis 50mg Xiamen spread word to protest -- and eventually halt -- construction of a chemical plant on Thursday. The $1.4 billion facility was meant to produce the petrochemical paraxylene, exposure to which can cause eye, nose or throat irritation, affect the central nervous system and may cause death. Though international standards dictate that such a plant should be 100 km from the nearest city, the short text messages that mobilized Xiamen's smart mob warned the factory would have been only 16 km away.

While the central government is how much does levitra cost clearly showing more interest in protecting the environment, local governments, eager to cut corners in the name of economics, are helping block the roguelephant.com path to sustainable development. But the Xiamen protests, thousands of people strong, are the latest sign of people power in China, where tens of thousands of protests over tainted land and water are recorded every year, threatening the government's dream of a "harmonious society" while pointing the way forward for environmental action in a place that seriously needs some.

That local officials in Xiamen reportedly began blocking text messages too in an attempt to generic viagra from china stem the protests, and that the protests continued apace, is an indication that, try as it might, China's authoritarian controls simply can't keep up with the power of it's cool buying generic cialis cell phones blogs, bulletin boards, and the purchasing cialis with next day delivery smartmobs they might create. (Local governments are getting into the SMS act themselves, using text messages to warn citizens of floods and even stop protests.)

Clearly, stopping protests just isn't possible the way it used to be. Between increasing countryside unrest (there may be nothing scarier to the government) and deadly pollution (China's rural cancer rate rose by 23 percent in the past two years, and more than 70 percent of the country's waterways and http://www.barefootfoundation.com/low-price-levitra 90 percent of its underground water are contaminated ) something's gotta give.

Since the plant's not been completely scrapped, residents are still protesting, according to Reuters. And the more word spreads, the more likely it is that protests will continue elsewhere too. An large expansion of a chemical plant in the southeastern city of Quanzhou that produces paraxylene and other chemicals was announced in March, funded by China's No. 2 oil company, Sinopec, Saudi Aramco, and ExxonMobil Corp. Paraxylene is a key material in polyethylene terephthalate (PET) saturated polyester polymers -- the stuff of which the world's plastic bottles are made.

Via SFGate and Asia Sentinel
 

Josh Dorfman: EcoGeek of the Week


I've just finished reading The Lazy Environmentalist by Josh Dorfman. While not every chapter was for me (babies and children?!) the book contains a gigantic amount of information on how to make good, informed, green decisions. Without condescension or guilt trips Dorfman lays down easy to digest information on how to live a cleaner greener life that isn't a big pain in the ass.

We recently had a chance to talk to discount drug viagra Josh about his book, which you can get at Amazon.com

EcoGeek: What is a Lazy Environmentalist?
Josh Dorfman: Lazy Environmentalists are people who want to be environmentally conscious, and will be, provided the africa-info.org choices are convenient and fit the way they want to live. Deep inside there’s probably a lazy environmentalist in just about all of www.grantontrailers.com us. After all, we live in the culture of convenience. The expectation of convenience seems like it has become hardwired into our DNA

EG: What do you say to the "America Can't Buy Its Way to Sustainability" argument?
JD: I’d say that I agree. But that doesn’t mean we ought to disregard all the really cool green solutions presently available to us to get us moving in a significantly greener direction. To really solve climate change and other serious environmental challenges we’re going to need a joint and massive effort from business, government, non-profit organizations, and consumer-citizens. We are all responsible for our situation, and we all have a role to play in achieving solutions.

EG: What, if anything, scares your pants off?
JD: The mindset that still thinks Hummers and www.chemistswithoutborders.org McMansions are a good idea. That and snakes.

EG: What what gives you the energy to http://vignovin.com/cialis-online-50mg do this for a living?
JD: I like operating on the cutting-edge and “green” is where the action is. “Green” is where the most innovation is taking place across nearly every industry. “Green” is what’s going to determine whether the 21st century is peaceful or chaotic. And there’s no going back. We have to deal with what’s in front of us. That’s the great challenge for every generation alive. What could be more exciting?

EG: EcoGeek wasn't listed in the "Electronics Information" resources section...WTF?
JD: A big mistake that’s being rectified immediately if not sooner.

 

Josh Dorfman: EcoGeek of the Week


I've just finished reading The Lazy Environmentalist by Josh Dorfman. While not every chapter was for me (babies and children?!) the book contains a gigantic amount of information on how to make good, informed, green decisions. Without condescension or guilt trips Dorfman lays down easy to digest information on how to live a cleaner greener life that isn't a big pain in the ass.

We recently had a chance to talk to Josh about his book, which you can get at Amazon.com

 

EcoGeek: What is a Lazy Environmentalist?
Josh Dorfman: Lazy Environmentalists are people who want to be environmentally conscious and will be provided the choices are convenient and fit the way they want to live. Deep inside there’s probably a lazy environmentalist in just about all of us. After all, we live in the culture of convenience. The expectation of convenience seems like it has become hardwired into our DNA

 

EcoGeek Cupcake?


Just wanted to share these charming sentiments from the EcoGeek cupcake at NatalieDee.com
 
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