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GE Launching 60W to 100W Replacement LED Bulbs


LED lighting is finally reaching mainstream.  As the years have gone by, the prices have dropped and we use it rx online levitra more appropriate bulbs for home use have started popping up.  Now that GE is releasing 60W, 75W and 100W replacement LED bulbs within the next 18 months, there's no more saying that LED bulbs aren't ready to replace incandescents yet.

The new bulbs follow GE's release of a 40W replacement bulb last year.  All models are dimmable and will have a lifespan of over 20 years based on three hours a day of use.  The 13W bulb (60W replacement) will be available this November, while the it's cool levitra for sale 18W (75W replacement) and 27W (100W replacement) bulbs will follow by the end of 2012.  The 60W bulb is the most popular incandescent bulb, so having an LED replacement ready for that brightness level is key to consumers making the tramadol medication online switch.

All of the GE LED bulbs will come in a range of buying levitra without prescription colors and shapes including bulbs suited for spot and flood lights, ceiling fans, candle and night lights and small and medium globes for lamps and http://africa-info.org/similar-cialis other fixtures.

via GE

 

Sony Cuts Emissions by 31% Since 2000


Sony made the announcement today that it has reduced its global CO2 emissions by 31 percent since 2000.  The company also achieved a 54 percent reduction in waste generation and a 41 percent reduction in water use, both of which far exceeded its goals.

The company improved the efficiency of its offices and manufacturing sites and upped the efficiency of many of its products too. Its Bravia LCD TV now requires 30 percent less power than it did in 2008 and its Blu-ray disc recorder models require 50 percent less power.

The waste reduction was mainly achieved through an increase in recycling practices.  The one target that Sony failed to meet was for volatile organic compound emissions -- it was shy by 5 percent.

These improvements were all made under the tech giant's Green Management 2010 plan.  Now going forward, Sony has a more ambitious plan.  The company announced its Road to Zero plan last year that includes a pledge to be zero carbon by 2050.  The next phase in the plan sees the cheap onlin viagra in usa company making the following reductions by 2015 compared to 2008 levels.

  • a 30 percent reduction in annual energy consumption
  • a 10 percent reduction in product mass
  • a 16 percent reduction in packaging waste
  • a 14 percent reduction in transport CO2 emissions
Let's hope Sony can exceed these targets as well.

via Treehugger

 

Are Airships Efficient Enough for EcoGeeks?

At EcoGeek, we are big fans of airships. A recent article at Txchnologist asks whether airships are poised to buy viagra usa make a comeback in the commercial sector, but other recent articles question whether they truly make sense. Are airships a realistic possibility?

Writing a commentary about his own article, author John Rennie asks if airships really offer the benefits we like to think they do. Another recent Scientific American blog post is even more critical of the idea of airships for transport.

One of purchase viagra the eternal tradeoffs in transportation is the time versus energy cost consideration. On one hand, there is how to order viagra over internet the cost of energy to move goods from point A to point B. Faster takes more energy, and is therefore more expensive. On the other hand, the time for a pilot or driver or other person to convey the goods has to be paid for, and a longer trip means more expense. The trick is to find the balance point between the two. This is, at least to some extent, what has driven the avaition industry away from propeller aircraft to the use of jets.

Trains are very efficient for moving heavy cargo, but train tracks don't go everywhere. A hybrid train and airship network might be useful to extend the http://www.fluestertuete.de/female-viagra reach of the current rail network without the expensive and difficult process of laying lots of new track. Trucks serve as the spokes for these networks right now. They are more expensive at moving freight than trains, but also more flexible. Is there room for that in the current transportation network? That seems to be one of the crucial questions. And, for now, the premium for trucks is not so high that other options are being sought.

The Scientific American article particularly focuses on speed versus cost as a tradeoff, but those are not the only factors that are relevant in considering airship, so the many current military developments are overlooked. Most present military uses under development are for long duration missions, where the simple lift of www.omroepgroesbeek.nl the airship makes it far more economical to operate than having conventional fixed-wing aircraft.

It may be many years before old, used military airships begin to be adapted for civilian uses, but we remain optimistic that airships will become a useful contributor to part of the transportation infrastructure of the future.

 

White Roofs Could Save a Year's Worth of Global CO2 Emissions


An infographic created by the White Roof Project, an initiative that wants to help cover the world's black roofs with white paint, illustrates some impressive statistics about the cialis free pills power of white roofs, including the fact that the transition from black to buying levitra online white roofs could prevent the emission of 24 billion metric tons of CO2, the same amount of buy viagra CO2 emitted globally in 2010.

The project says that if we covered just 5 percent of roofs with white paint per year, we'd be done by 2030. White roofs can reflect 85 percent of sunlight compare to 20 percent for black roofs and buildings with white roofs stay up to 35 degrees cooler, which means less electricity required for cooling the buildings.  In large cities, white roofs also curb the heat island effect, cooling the city as a whole.

In addition to the emissions savings, white roofs could save 14 power plants' worth of energy in 11 large cities, save $5 billion in energy costs in the U.S., reduce smog, blackout risk and viagra delivery two days heart-related deaths and Bill Clinton has said it's the quickest, cheapest thing we can do.  So, what are we waiting for?

If you live in NYC, you can volunteer for the White Roof Project or adopt a building.  The project plans to cover the roofs of an entire East Village block in white paint this August.  You can view the www.aco.ca entire infographic here.

via GOOD

 

Energy Star Now Labeling "Most Efficient"


The Energy Star program has been working on how to buy viagra in canada making its qualifications stricter, but across all the appliances there are still many bearing the label that aren't really that much of an improvement over other models.  To make it clearer which appliances are really the best of the best, Energy Star will now identify the top tier appliances with a "Most Efficient" label.

The new label will apply to just 5 percent of Energy Star washing machines, heating and cooling equipment, televisions and refrigerators/freezers.  The EPA may add more categories of appliances later this year.

To give you an idea of what the new label means, for refrigerators/freezers to earn the "Most Efficient" title, they have to illegal viagra sales canada be 30 percent more efficient than standard models, while TVs will have to be about 80 percent more efficient that standard models.  Out of the existing 1,800 refrigerators and freezers that are Energy Star certified, only 15 qualify for the new label, while only 18 out of viagra best price the 1,400 Energy Star TVs qualify.

While the Energy Star label should carry more weight than it does, it's still a good that the most efficient appliances are being properly identified and hopefully the new label will inspire more competition from companies to create even more efficient products.

via Greenbiz

 
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