Priligy online now, save money

APR 21

Recent Comment

"[quote]And France sends a large portion of its nuclear waste to Russia..."

View all Comments

The UK's First Hydrogen Fueling Station Opens

Last week saw the opening of the first hydrogen fuelling station in England. The station is based at Birmingham University, where experiments are being carried out to test the viability of phizer viagra made in canada hydrogen in transport applications, as part of Birmingham’s ‘Science City’ hydrogen energy project.

Researchers will compare five hydrogen-powered vehicles with the university’s own fleet of petrol, diesel, and electric vehicles to learn more about efficiency and wow look it real cialis online without prescription performance. The main aim is to work out exactly how the generic soft tab viagra vehicles might need to be adapted to canadian pharmacy cialis enable the cost-effective use of hydrogen vehicles in the future.

The Series-100 station has been specially designed by Air-Products, a Pennsylvania-based hydrogen producer and supplier. The fueller is made up of an integrated compression, hydrogen storage, and dispensing system, optimised to fuel up to six vehicles per day. Crucially, the system is portable, making it a perfect choice for start-up stations.

Looking ahead, the research team hope that the results of the project will encourage greater government support, particularly of the financial kind, and help kick-start the wider application of cheap discount cialis a hydrogen-fuelling infrastructure across the UK.

Via Autoindustry

See BBC video footage of the opening here

Hits: 21681
Comments (16)Add Comment
0
Hydrogen? WTF?
written by nuvi, April 22, 2008
Hydrogen is one of the dumbest ideas. Thermodynamically useless.

Read Joseph Romm's Hype about Hydrogen
0
...
written by jake3988, April 22, 2008
Er, no it's not.

Hydrogen is a great idea it's just very energy intensive to make it.

Unlike america however, most countries in Europe inc the U.K. use almost entirely non-coal sources for their electricity thus rendering the www.ncitech.co.uk 'energy-itensive' moot.

Go England!
0
...
written by curt, April 22, 2008
Hydrogen certainly holds the important part of our present and even more our future.
Oil was a 'dumb idea' to many people in the past, as well. We possess all knowledge we need for wider and appropriate use of hydrogen, but it is good choice canada viagra prescription going to take some more time, because of oil lobby, which controls most of the real Power of this planet and is a form of strong opposition to wide use of hydrogen.
0
...
written by Blake, April 22, 2008
Hydrogen is still completely up in the air; none of viagra cialis levitra us have any idea what's going to happen with it. However, this is an excellent idea. There's no substitute for actually getting out there and doing some real-world testing. Kudos to herbal alternative to levitra Birmingham U.
0
...
written by Chris, April 22, 2008
"Hydrogen is one of the dumbest ideas. Thermodynamically useless. "

Well, no, obviously, it's not. You know, if a university went so far to have its own hydrogen pumping station and to run all the tests, don't you think they would have done their homework first?
0
...
written by Bob Wallace, April 22, 2008
If you're starting with electricity and look there cheap discount viagra then using that energy to produce hydrogen vs. charging batteries to power a vehicle you're going to loose significant power at each step along the hydrogen path.

It's much more efficient to store and deliver power via batteries vs. hydrogen. IIRC, you get twice as much power delivered - tire to the road - with batteries opposed to i use it buy cialis from canada hydrogen. That means that were we to go hydrogen we would have to build twice as many wind farms, solar systems, etc.

And you don't need vast amounts of water for battery powered vehicles as you do viagra purchase when creating hydrogen.

As for the university doing the research - knowledge is a good thing. If we learn something from their efforts, that's to the better.

But you might want to check and see where the viagra equivalent funding is coming from. Sometimes endeavors like this are undertaken because corporations make funding easily available.

0
...
written by Bob Wallace, April 22, 2008
If you're starting with electricity and then using that energy to produce hydrogen vs. charging batteries to power a vehicle you're going to loose significant power at each step along the hydrogen path.

It's much more efficient to store and deliver power via batteries vs. hydrogen. IIRC, you get twice as much power delivered - tire to the road - with batteries opposed to hydrogen. That means that were we to go hydrogen we would have to build twice as many wind farms, solar systems, etc.

And you don't need vast amounts of water for battery powered vehicles as you do when creating hydrogen.

As for the university doing the research - knowledge is a good thing. If we learn something from their efforts, that's to the better.

But you might want to check and see where the funding is coming from. Sometimes endeavors like this are undertaken because corporations make funding easily available.

0
...
written by Dan, April 22, 2008
Some of the things I like about hydrogen is:
It's the most abundant element in the universe.
Vehicles can be quickly refueled with it.

Until we can get very fast recharging batteries or batteries that can provide you power at 65mph for 12 hours, I think hydrogen needs to be looked at.

Is it the end all solution for vehicles...doubtful, but possible.
0
...
written by Bob Wallace, April 22, 2008
65 MPH for 12 hours?

780 miles non-stop?

You're not going to get that with a hydrogen engine. (And danged few people would be even slightly interested in that sort of range.)

The (seems to be) upcoming BYD (Chinese) BEV is expected to give one about 180 miles on a full charge. That's an overnight plug in.

Then it can be quick charged to generic cialis soft tabs 80% capacity in around 15 minutes. (Think a lunch break after three hours on the highway.)

That should give you another 150 miles or so prior to stopping for afternoon tea. (Or emergency haircut.)

0
...
written by EV, April 22, 2008
Unlike america however, most countries in Europe inc the U.K. use almost entirely non-coal sources for their electricity thus rendering the 'energy-itensive' moot.

Wanna bet? The UK gets 35% of it's electricity from coal and 38% from natural gas. Germany generates roughly 55% of it's electricity from Coal and 15% from natural gas.

France is probably the only country in mainland Europe your statement fits where almost 80% of electricity is generated from nuclear power and only about 10% from CO2 generating sourcing.
0
...
written by Bob Wallace, April 22, 2008
And France sends a large portion of its nuclear waste to Russia where it's ....?

We don't really know. Most of it (~90%) simply drops out of sight.


0
...
written by jake3988, April 23, 2008
EV
France is probably the only country in mainland Europe your statement fits where almost 80% of electricity is generated from nuclear power and only about 10% from CO2 generating sourcing.
=====================

I hate feeding trolls, but in case people take you seriously...

Wikipedia, with its sources sited, along with other webpages using simple google search confirm that Norway, Switzerland, England, France, and Iceland all have nearly 100% renewable energy. The EU is incredibly strict on environmental issues.

Iceland gets most of its power from geothermal. Norway, Switzerland, and England from hydroelectric. France and others from nuclear.
0
Jake
written by Hank, April 23, 2008
@Jake....I don't know where you're getting those numbers, but they're very wrong. The target for Europe is just try! cialis prescriptionsgeneric cialis sale to get 20% of power renewably by 2020. Obviously, they're a ways away from those numbers now. The UK currently gets more than 75% of its power from coal and natural gas. The only country on your list that gets more than half its power from renewable sources is Iceland.
0
Hydrogen is a global initiative
written by Miguel, April 23, 2008
Many excellent points have been raised about hydrogen. The Hydrogen Education Foundation is helping people recognize that the transition to include hydrogen as an alternative is a global endeavor. As the US considers energy alternatives, to remain economically competitive, hydrogen should be considered as a fuel.

Iceland is on the verge of becoming the first country to be fully powered by hydrogen technologies. Here is a video that was recently posted on discount cialis cialis YouTube about Iceland’s transition to hydrogen: http://youtube.com/watch?v=U79CWDtdZOA. Other countries such as China, Japan, England, France and more are all actively pursuing the use of hydrogen for power supply and cheap viagra canada automotive fuel needs. In fact, attendees at both the Olympics in Bejing in 2008 and Vancouver in 2010 will be able to travel around the http://sfachc.org/buy-viagra-without-a-prescription city on hydrogen fuel cell buses.

To learn more about the benefits of vignovin.com hydrogen, we invite everyone to please visit www.h2andyou.org.
0
100% Renewable Energy in Europe?
written by Christian, April 26, 2008
That would be great - but all the countries cited in the comment are far away from that. As Hank has correctly stated, Europe aims to have 20% renewable energy in 2020. Besides that, nuclear power does not really fit into the renewable energy column, because it is not renewable. You always need Uranium - and there is not an endless supply of that....
0
To Bob Wallace ,
written by Stibbons, July 15, 2008
And France sends a large portion of its nuclear waste to Russia where it's ....?

We don't really know. Most of it (~90%) simply drops out of sight.

Nop, we have waste stations, and we even receive nuclear wastes from other countries.

Write comment

security code
Write the displayed characters


busy
 

Are you an EcoGeek?

We've got to keep 7 billion people happy without destroying our planet. It's the biggest challenge we've ever faced....but we're taking it on. Are you with us?




The Most Popular Articles