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New Miracle Concrete…A Carbon Storage Solution?


Researchers are constantly on the i use it buy canadian cialis online look-out for new materials that can store or use up CO2, or new methods to sequester it. Carbon Sense Solutions has created an accelerated curing process for the creation of precast concrete, which it claims will suck up as much as 1% of all CO2 emissions in the atmosphere annually.

Concrete carbonation – the sucking up of CO2 by concrete as it cures – occurs naturally, but Carbon Sense Solutions says its faster curing method gets concrete to suck up more CO2 in a way that uses off-the-shelf technology that can be slapped on to their existing equipment. The process also uses 30% to 40% less energy to http://medicamentosseguros.com/viagra-non-prescription manufacture. The lower amount of energy used and genuine cialis online the avoidance of generic 40 mg levitra expensive new equipment makes the wonder-concrete cheaper, and more profitable. Additional positive byproducts of the method are that the concrete is more durable, and more resistant to shrinking, cracking and water absorption.

While it sounds miracle cure-ish, it isn’t, necessarily. The company says that a plant could have a line of concrete not suitable for this carbonation process, and so the generic levitra cialis CO2 emitted to create it can be pumped into their CO2 sequestering concrete line, potentially becoming a net-zero CO2 emitter. The numbers for that don’t seem to easily line up, though it’s a nice dream. Concrete production creates about 5% of global CO2 emissions. This new process only soaks up about 1% percent of that. So, it’s really more of an off-set process than a carbon storage solution. Even so, off-setting 1% of global CO2 emissions annually – or looking at it another way, sequestering 20% of the CO2 created by the concrete production industry – while still creating a material that is the most abundant human-made material on earth is pretty great.

The process is still unproven, but holds a lot of potential for making an impact on http://www.aco.ca/best-place-viagra CO2 emissions. A pilot plant is low cost canadian viagra planned to go up in Nova Scotia this summer, and we should hear by the end of the year preliminary results.

Via EcoFriend, Inhabitat, ABC News, CleanTech, Technology Review

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Comments (8)Add Comment
0
Good.
written by bbm, August 01, 2008
But there was another anouncement, along similar lines, of a Vinod Khosola funded company that will also sequester CO2 in concrete... but the scope of http://dependablehealthcareservices.com/pa/joycejacob/viagra-lowest-price available absorbtion would be much higher.

0
What about zero carbon emission?
written by frisbee, August 01, 2008
Great, so now 20% less carbon can be emitted in concrete manufacturing. But still carbon concentrations are rising in the atmosphere every time we use concrete!

The Romans used volcano ashes (called pozzolano) for their concrete and with that made it in an almost carbon neutral way!
Pozzolano isn't easily available all over the world, but I doubt whether the concrete industry will not be able to find a similar chemical substance.

It's just that I wonder why concrete industry is hardly ever being mentioned in the carbon discussion. They emit as much carbon as aviation! Please keep on mentioning this item!
0
Do something!
written by Paul Barthle, August 01, 2008
If we look at these ideas the way that venture capitalists would , then we would expect to visit web site buying viagra see numerous attempts with only a modicum of success. Microsoft and Apple were not the www.velikibrat.us only startups of their kind, but name the others. I can't, but I'm sure they existed.
0
Why produce it in the first place?
written by Peter Anderson, August 02, 2008
I think carbon sequestration is insane. I'd rather the money and effort went into sensible renewable energy that doesn't produce the carbon in the first place. What happens when the concrete is broken up? The carbon comes straight back out...
0
@ Paul Barthle
written by e, August 02, 2008
The Star system by Xerox Parc. They invented the mouse, the desktop metaphor, icons... ...they had an office suite with a word processor, spreadsheet, mail client, etc. Steve Jobs visited Xerox Parc, then took his whole engineering team to the next trade fair where The Star was being displayed. They didn't have the the best choice cheapest levitra in uk resources to complete the desktop AND the office suite so they asked Microsoft to do the office suite for them. The rest you can probably work out.
0
@ Peter Anderson
written by e, August 02, 2008
The concrete can be downcycled into aggregate that still contains the carbon. It can then be used to make shiny new concrete, formed for a different purpose. Recycling the concrete can be done cost effectively (as the aggregate has to be crushed & graded anyway) & it gets you points toward green stars. Project managers on commercial projects get all gooey over green stars because commercial tenants get all gooey over green stars

These guys need to organise how many points a commercial project will get for using their new concrete & get into compliance & certification. That's what I think.
0
Durability of the concrete
written by Nicolas Lauzier, August 05, 2008
Isn't it where you get the biggest CO2 reduction? Reducing the theglobalobservatory.org carbon emitted initially by 20% is good, but if your road lasts a few more years than you don't need as much concrete and you don't need as much repairs. That's pretty good to rx online levitra me!
0
Don't you pollute to produce concrete?
written by concreteartsit101, May 16, 2009
Gasoline, dust, excavation of material, etc all cause pollution how can this be a viable option?

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